Rupa Goswami set aside 50% of his accumulated money for God, 25% for the relatives, family members, and 25% he kept in some village banker or the original bankers, for emergency

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Expressions researched:
"He divided the money in a very exemplary manner, which should be followed by devotees in particular and by humanity in general" |"he set aside 50% of his accumulated money for God, 25% for the relatives, family members, and 25% he kept in some village banker or the original bankers, for emergency"

Lectures

Bhagavad-gita As It Is Lectures

He set aside 50% of his accumulated money for God, 25% for the relatives, family members, and 25% he kept in some village banker or the original bankers, for emergency. So that was the system. We can see from great sages and ācāryas that whatever we earn... According to Bhagavad-gītā, it is said, yajñārthāt karmaṇo 'nyatra. Whatever you earn, yat karoṣi yaj juhoṣi. The result of your work should be offered to the Supreme.
Lecture on BG 3.8-13 -- New York, May 20, 1966:

Now, this Rūpa and Sanātana, when they retired from their service, they brought home gold coins. At that time there was no currency notes. Actual value gold coins were in... Now, that gold coins was about two and a half ounce weight. Just like imagine what is the value now, whatever it may be. That means the estimation is some millions of rupees they brought home after their retirement. And they divided the money in this way: 50% for God... Whatever they accumulated, they set aside 50% for God or God's service. God means God's service. God is not want of your money. (chuckles) He is quite competent to earn money. He doesn't require anything. But if we give, it is our interest. It is our interest. So he set aside 50% of his accumulated money for God, 25% for the relatives, family members, and 25% he kept in some village banker or the original bankers, for emergency.

So that was the system. We can see from great sages and ācāryas that whatever we earn... According to Bhagavad-gītā, it is said, yajñārthāt karmaṇo 'nyatra. Whatever you earn, yat karoṣi yaj juhoṣi. The result of your work should be offered to the Supreme. Now, if it is not possible to offer the whole thing to the Supreme, so at least one should offer 50% of his income for God's purpose. That is the example we get from these ācāryas. So 50% for God, 25%... Of course, the relatives, they expect something from the father or the chief of the family, some, I mean to say, gift. They expect something. But according to these ācārya rulings, the gift was only 25%, not that whatever money I have got, I leave to my family and go singlehanded to God. Ye yathā māṁ prapadyante tāṁs tathaiva bhajāmy aham (BG 4.11). If God asks you, "What you have sacrificed for Me? You have come to Me." "No Sir. I have sacrificed everything for my family. For my family." That is not good. That is not yajña. Yajña means... Now, if you cannot spare your money separately for God's service, then you can engage yourself in God's service and expend the money for God's service. Don't offer your money in other's hand, but you spend yourself for God's cause. That will make you perfect.

Nectar of Devotion Lectures

Sakara Mallika, who was later to become Rūpa Gosvāmī, retired from his post and collected all the money he had accumulated during his service. It is described in the Caitanya-caritāmṛta that his accumulated savings in gold coins equaled millions of dollars and filled a large boat. He divided the money in a very exemplary manner, which should be followed by devotees in particular and by humanity in general.
The Nectar of Devotion -- Vrndavana, October 16, 1972:

Lord Caitanya's principle is universal. Anyone who knows the science of Kṛṣṇa and is engaged in the service of the Lord is accepted as being in a higher position than a person born in the family of a brāhmaṇa. That is the original principle accepted by all Vedic literatures, especially by the Bhagavad-gītā and the Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam. The principle of Lord Caitanya's movement in educating and elevating everyone to the exalted post of a gosvāmī is taught in the Nectar of Devotion.

Lord Caitanya met the two brothers, Dabira Khāsa and Sākara Mallika in a village known as Rāmakeli in the district known as Maldah, and after that meeting the brothers decided to retire from government service and join Lord Caitanya. Sakara Mallika, who was later to become Rūpa Gosvāmī, retired from his post and collected all the money he had accumulated during his service. It is described in the Caitanya-caritāmṛta that his accumulated savings in gold coins equaled millions of dollars and filled a large boat. He divided the money in a very exemplary manner, which should be followed by devotees in particular and by humanity in general. Fifty percent of his accumulated wealth was distributed to the Kṛṣṇa conscious persons, namely the brāhmaṇas and the Vaiṣṇavas. Twenty-five percent was distributed to relatives. And twenty-five percent was kept against emergency expenditures and personal difficulties. Later on when Dabira Khāsa also proposed to retire, the Nawab was very much agitated and put him into jail. But Dabira Khāsa who was later to become..."

Prabhupāda: In this connection, we may inform that our disciples in Kṛṣṇa consciousness movement, those who are gṛhasthas, they contribute at least fifty percent of their income. Yes. Most of them, they are full-time engaged. But if one cannot be whole time engaged... Just like we, we have got our disciple, Professor Howard Wheeler. He gives more than fifty percent of his income for developing our New Vrindaban scheme. So we try to follow these principles laid down by Rūpa Gosvāmī, that fifty percent for Kṛṣṇa or Kṛṣṇa's devotees, twenty-five percent for personal emergencies and twenty-five percent for the dependent relatives.