King Mucukunda said, "My dear Lord (Krsna), because of my bad deeds in the past I am everlastingly aggrieved. I am always suffering from my desires, but still my senses are never satisfied with material enjoyments"

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Expressions researched:
"My dear Lord, because of my bad deeds in the past I am everlastingly aggrieved. I am always suffering from my desires, but still my senses are never satisfied with material enjoyments"

Other Books by Srila Prabhupada

Nectar of Devotion

In the Tenth Canto, 51st Chapter, 39th verse of Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam there is the following statement by King Mucukunda: "My dear Lord, because of my bad deeds in the past I am everlastingly aggrieved. I am always suffering from my desires, but still my senses are never satisfied with material enjoyments. Somehow or other I am, by Your grace, now in a peaceful condition because I have taken shelter of Your lotus feet, which are always free from all lamentation, fear and death.

In the Tenth Canto, 14th Chapter, 9th verse of Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam there is a statement by Brahmā: "My dear Lord, just see my impudence! You are unlimited, the original Personality of Godhead, the supersoul—and You rule over the most perfect illusory energies! And just see my impudence! I wanted to supersede You by my own personal power, and I was very puffed up with this tiny power of mine. Just as a simple spark from a fire cannot do any harm to the fire, so my bewildering potency was completely unsuccessful in thwarting Your superior illusory power. Therefore I find myself to be most insignificant and think of myself as a most useless person." This statement by Brahmā is an instance of lamentation caused by committing an offense.

Humility

A sense of weakness caused by distress, fearfulness or offensiveness is called humility. In this condition one becomes talkative, small in heart, dirty in mind, full of anxiety and inactive.

In the Tenth Canto, 51st Chapter, 39th verse of Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam there is the following statement by King Mucukunda: "My dear Lord, because of my bad deeds in the past I am everlastingly aggrieved. I am always suffering from my desires, but still my senses are never satisfied with material enjoyments. Somehow or other I am, by Your grace, now in a peaceful condition because I have taken shelter of Your lotus feet, which are always free from all lamentation, fear and death. O supreme protector, O supreme soul! O supreme controller! Kindly give me Your protection. I am so much embarrassed." This statement by Mucukunda is an instance of humility resulting from a severely miserable condition of material existence.

When Uttarā was attacked by the brahmāstra of Aśvatthāmā, she became afraid of losing her child, Mahārāj Parīkṣit, who was still within the womb. She immediately surrendered to Kṛṣṇa and said, "My dear Lord, kindly save my child! I do not mind if I myself must be killed by the brahmāstra of Aśvatthāmā." This is an instance of humility caused by fear.