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This world is creation of this avyakta. And beyond this avyakta, there is another nature. That is spiritual nature

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"This world is creation of this avyakta. And beyond this avyakta, there is another nature. That is spiritual nature"

Lectures

Bhagavad-gita As It Is Lectures

Divyam, transcendental. And Śrīpāda Śaṅkarācārya also, who especially preached impersonalism, he also admits that nārāyaṇaḥ paraḥ avyaktāt: "Nārāyaṇa, the form of Nārāyaṇa, is beyond the range of this avyakta." Avyakta and . . . this world is creation . . . avyaktād anya-sambhavaḥ. This world is creation of this avyakta. And beyond this avyakta, there is another nature. That is spiritual nature. That is explained in the Bhagavad-gītā: paras tasmāt tu bhāvaḥ anyaḥ avyaktaḥ avyaktāt sanātanaḥ (BG 8.20).

Uttamā-bhakti, first-class bhakti, what is that? Anyābhilāṣitā-śūnyam: without any kind of desire than to serve the Lord. And in the Śrīmad-Bhāgavatam also, it is said, sa vai puṁsāṁ paro dharmaḥ (SB 1.2.6). Paraḥ means transcendental, beyond this material conception. Kṛṣṇa, or the Absolute, Nārāyaṇa, that is para. Nārāyaṇaḥ paraḥ avyaktāt. Nārāyaṇa is not anything of this material world. Nārāyaṇa, Kṛṣṇa, Viṣṇu, the Absolute Personality of Godhead, He is not anything of this material world.

When we use this word, nirākāra, that means His form is not anything of this material world. But He has got His form. That is a transcendental form, sac-cid-ānanda-vigrahaḥ (Bs. 5.1). Nirākāra means He, He has no such form, as we have got this material form. This material form is neither of the three transcendental bliss, sac-cid-ānanda. This is asat, acit and nirānanda. This body, this material body, is asat, acit and nirānanda.

Therefore, when in the Vedic literature or in authorized statement we find "Nirākāra," that means His form does not belong to this asat, acit or nirānanda. But He has His form. Divyam. Janma karma me divyam (BG 4.9). Divyam, transcendental. And Śrīpāda Śaṅkarācārya also, who especially preached impersonalism, he also admits that nārāyaṇaḥ paraḥ avyaktāt: "Nārāyaṇa, the form of Nārāyaṇa, is beyond the range of this avyakta." Avyakta and . . . this world is creation . . . avyaktād anya-sambhavaḥ. This world is creation of this avyakta. And beyond this avyakta, there is another nature. That is spiritual nature. That is explained in the Bhagavad-gītā: paras tasmāt tu bhāvaḥ anyaḥ avyaktaḥ avyaktāt sanātanaḥ (BG 8.20).

So this situation . . . Kṛṣṇa is advising . . . no. I mean to say, Arjuna advising, rathaṁ sthāpaya me acyuta. Acyuta. Kṛṣṇa is not cyuta. Kṛṣṇa is acyuta. Cyuta means those who are fallen in the material world. They are cyuta. We are fallen in the material world. Therefore we have accepted this material body. Icchā-dveṣa-samutthena sarge yānti parantapa (BG 7.27). Icchā. Icchā means desire, and dveṣa means envy, enviousness. Icchā-dveṣa-samutthena. When we become envious of Kṛṣṇa and we want to enjoy this material world, then we come to this material creation. Icchā-dveṣa-samutthena sarge yānti parantapa.

So any one of us, we . . . who is in this material world, having a material body, beginning from Brahmā down to the ant, a small ant, any one of them . . . in the Brahmā-saṁhitā it is said that yas tv indra-gopam athavendra-maho sva-karma-bandhānurūpa-phala-bhājanam atanoti (Bs. 5.54). Indra-gopa. There is a, there is an insect which is called in Sanskrit language as indra-gopa. It is a microbe.