Bhagavad-gita is so nice book and it is accepted. Not that because we are preaching Krsna consciousness, we are advocating for Bhagavad... No. It is accepted by scholarly section, religious section, not only in India, but all over the world

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"Bhagavad-gītā is so nice book, and it is accepted. Not that because we are preaching Kṛṣṇa consciousness, we are advocating for Bhagavad . . . No" |"It is accepted by scholarly section, religious section, not only in India, but all over the world"

Conversations and Morning Walks

1969 Conversations and Morning Walks

Bhagavad-gītā is so nice book and it is accepted. Not that because we are preaching Kṛṣṇa consciousness, we are advocating for Bhagavad... No. It is accepted by scholarly section, religious section, not only in India, but all over the world. Perhaps you know. In every country there are thousands of Bhagavad-gītā translation, in every language, in English, in French, in German, all languages.


People can be peaceful by knowing three things. If he perfectly understands only three things, then he'll become peaceful. What is that? Bhoktāraṁ yajña-tapasāṁ. All the sacrifices, austerities, penances, whatever people are undertaking for perfection, the enjoyer of such activities, Kṛṣṇa says: "I am." "I am."

Just like your activities. This is also a kind of austerities. Your artistic songs, they have become popular because you have undergone some austerities. You have come to the perfection. That requires penance and austerities. Or any scientific discovery, that requires austerities. So every nice thing presented in the world, that requires austerity. Very devout, painstaking. Then it comes successful. That is called yajña, tapasya.

So Kṛṣṇa says: "The result of the tapasya enjoyer, I am." He is claiming. "The result of your tapasya should come to Me." Then you'll be satisfied. Bhoktāraṁ yajña-tapasāṁ sarva-loka-maheśvaram (BG 5.29). People are claiming, "This is my England" and "This is my India," "This is my Germany," "This is my China." No. Everything belongs to God, Kṛṣṇa. Sarva-loka. Not only on this planet. We have divided this planet in so many states. Actually, this planet was not divided.

From the history of Mahābhārata we understand, this planet, there was only one king, one emperor, in India, Hastinapur. Even up to five thousand years ago, there was only one king, Mahārāja Parīkṣit, one flag. And he came out for touring over his kingdom, and he found somebody near Sindh, a black man killing a cow. And he immediately arrested him: "Oh, in my kingdom you are killing cow?"

So actually the whole planet was under one flag, one suzerainty. Gradually it has become small, small, small, small, small. Just like in our, very recently, twenty years ago, India became divided, Pakistan and Hindustan. Actually India was one, but we see now it is Pakistan. And some day another "stan" will be divided. So this is going on.

So sarva-loka, in all planets, all the planets, actually that is God's place. Nobody's place. We come here empty-handed; we go empty-handed. How we can claim? Suppose you have given me this place to stay. I stay for one week, and if I claim, "Oh, this is my room," is that very nice thing? (laughs) There will be immediately some disagreement, trouble. But you have kindly spared this room. I am living here. I can comfortably live, enjoy. And when my necessity . . . when I go, there is no trouble.

Similarly, we come here in the kingdom of God empty-handed; we go empty-handed. Why we trouble that, "This is my property," "This is my country," "This is my world," "This is my planet"? Why we claim like that? Is it not insanity? Wherefrom the claim comes? So Kṛṣṇa says that sarva-loka-maheśvaram: "I am the Supreme Lord of every place." And suhṛdaṁ sarva-bhūtānāṁ (BG 5.29), and He is the real friend of every living entity. Īśvaraḥ sarva-bhūtānāṁ hṛd-deśe 'rjuna tiṣṭhati (BG 18.61). As a friend, He is sitting within your heart. He's so nice friend.

In this material world we make friendship, it breaks. Or the friend lives somewhere, and I live somewhere. But He's so nice friend that He's living within, with me and within my heart. He is so nice friend. Sarva-bhūtānāṁ. He's not only selected friends. No. Even the most insignificant creature, He is living there, Paramātmā. So if these three things are understood clearly, then he becomes peaceful. This is peace formula.

So everything is there in the Bhagavad-gītā and Vedic literature. Simply one has to learn. Just like in arithmetic, there is all mathematical calculation, addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, this or that, fraction. One has to learn. So Bhagavad-gītā is so nice book, and it is accepted. Not that because we are preaching Kṛṣṇa consciousness, we are advocating for Bhagavad . . . No.

It is accepted by scholarly section, religious section, not only in India, but all over the world. Perhaps you know. In every country there are thousands of Bhagavad-gītā translation, in every language—in English, in French, in German, all languages. And even Muhammadans . . . of course, scholarly Muhammadans, they also read very nicely Bhagavad-gītā.

I know one Muhammadan professor in India; he was a great devotee of Lord Kṛṣṇa. He did not disclose that he was a devotee, but he was observing Janmāṣṭamī fasting day, and he was writing one article on Kṛṣṇa every Janmāṣṭamī day. There are many, they read. And in our childhood . . . not childhood, we were young man at that time. So one Englishman was a tenant in Calcutta, my friend's house. So he was vacating the house.

We went to take possession of that house, and he had many books, and there was a book, Bhagavad-gītā. So that my friend, Mr. Mullik, he was a little astonished that, "He is Englishman, he's Christian. How is that, he has got Bhagavad-gītā?" So he was touching that book, and that gentleman thought that, "He is my landlord. He may like that book." So he immediately said: "Oh, Mr. Mullik, I cannot present that book to you. This is my life and soul." He said like that.

So Bhagavad-gītā is accepted by scholarly section, by philosophers. So I think people should have one scripture, one God, one mantra, and one activity. One God, Kṛṣṇa. One scripture: Bhagavad-gītā. And one mantra, Hare Kṛṣṇa. And one activity: to serve Kṛṣṇa. That's all. There will be peace. There will be actually peace all over the world.

So I request you to . . . at least to understand this philosophy to your best knowledge. And if you think that is nice, you take up. You are also willing to give something to the world. So you try this. (pause) You have read our books, this Bhagavad-gītā As It Is?